Dr. Heiner Mikosch - Seminar Presentation

Prof. Chad Meyerhoefer

Date and Time: March 15th 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

This paper is the first to use instrumental variables to estimate the causal impact of youth obesity on medical care costs in order to address the endogeneity of weight. We use restricted-use data on 11-17 year old children from the 2000 - 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey,

allowing us to instrument for child BMI using the BMI of the child´s biological parents. We use the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey as a source of validation data to correct for reporting error due to parental reporting of height and weight. We find that previous research has underestimated the cost of youth obestiy. We also find evidence that the costs of youth obestiy are borne mostly by third party-payers, and that public programs pay most of the costs.

About the speaker

Chad D. Meyerhoefer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Lehigh University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He currently holds the Arthur F. Searing Professorship and served as Director / Co-Director of Ph.D. Program in Business and Economics from 2009 - 2015. Professor Meyerhoefer´s research focuses on the economics of health and nutrition, and utilizes microeconometric methods to evaluate and inform public policy.

His current research focuses on the economics of health and nutrition, and utilizes microeconometric methods to evaluate and inform public policy. His current research projects include estimating the price responsiveness of consumer demand for medical services, predicting the medical care costs of obestiy, and determining the impact of electronic health record adoption on physician productivity and health care quality. This research has been published outlets such as the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Health Economics, Health Affairs, Health Economics, Pediatrics, and PharmacoEconomics.