Dr. Heiner Mikosch - Seminar Presentation

Date and Time: November 23rd, 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

We build a simple banking firm model to understand why Chinese banks sell wealth management products (WMPs). Such products are supposed to be pooled investments in which banks only serve as the “agent”, but we argue that WMPs are more similar as non-checkable deposit than as investment funds.

Date and Time: November 16th, 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

We construct aggregates based on four superlative index numbers, the Fisher, Sato-Vartia, Törnqvist and Walsh and the atheoretical simple sum for previously identified weakly separable blockings of goods. We examine how well these aggregates “fit” the data.

Date and Time: October 12th, 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

In the presence of limited liability, the incentive compatibility constraints in financial contracting models with asymmetric information are wekaer than assumed in much of the literature. In this paper, we identify the problem that has been overlooked in the literature and provide a rigorous proof of optimality of debt contracts under fairly general assumptions.

Date and Time: September 29th, 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

About the paper

This paper evaluates potentially heterogeneous direct plus indirect effects of policy-related trade costs. It accounts for endogeneity in policy-related trade costs by modelling how they are determined by fundamental drivers of bilateral trade.

It disentangle two sources of non-linearity/heterogeneity:

Date and Time: September 2nd, 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Since the beginning of the financial crisis, a lively debate has emerged regarding which monetary policy rule the Fed (and other central banks) should follow, if any. To clarify this debate, several questions must be answered. Which monetary policy rule fits best

Date and Time: May 23rd, 2016, 10:30 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

About the Speaker

Dr. Fei Song is a Professor of HRM/OB in the Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University. Dr. Fei Song is trained in the field of Organizational Behavior. She received her PhD from the Schulich School of Business in 2005.

Date and Time: May 23rd, 2016, 10:30 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

About the Speaker

Prof. C. Bram Cadsby is Full Professor of Economics at the University of Guelphs, Canada. He received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are experimental economics.

Date and Time: May 20th, 2016, 3:00 - 4:30 pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Rajan (2010) points to rising income inequality as a root cause of the recent financial crisis through high household leverage. However, some empirical studies conclude that crises bear no relation to inequality.

Date and Time: April 7th 2016, 9:30 - 12:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

We develop a multi-period model that illustrates the relationship between a publication that ranks universities and students (e.g., high school seniors) who possibly view the ranking and use it in their decisions about which universities to attend. The basic assumption underlying our model

Date and Time: March 28th 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Agriculture formed the main sector of Chinese preindustrial economy and remained largely distant from commercialization. Although in the previous chapters I have explored long-term changes in the market economy, it is still doubtful whether the cycle of market development and changes in living standards I have described were applicable to the agricultural sector and thus had any impact on the livelihoods of the majority of the population.

Date and Time: March 21st 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Does financial development stimulate international portfolio diversification? Previous studies have demonstrated that, in addition to financial liberalization, financial development helps domestic investors increase their access to foreign markets and diversify investments abroad.

Date and Time: March 15th 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

This paper is the first to use instrumental variables to estimate the causal impact of youth obesity on medical care costs in order to address the endogeneity of weight. We use restricted-use data on 11-17 year old children from the 2000 - 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey,

Date and Time: March 14th 2016, 10:00 - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

In this paper we document the asymmetric role that the U.S. stock market plays in the international predictability of excess stock returns during recession and expansion periods. Most of the positive evidence accrues during the periods of recessions in the United States. During the expansions there is only a limited evidence supporting the importance of lagged U.S. returns in predictability of stock returns in 10 industrialised countries.

Date and Time: February 26th 2016, 10:00 - 11:00 am

Room: A101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

We develop a model of scarce renewable resources to study the problem of the commons. Our model formulation divers from the existing literature in that it assumes the use of the commons to be stochastic in nature. One example is microwave spectrum fro mobile and wireless communications.