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03
Jun
2019

Yuyun Liu (Sun Yat-sen University) - Does Dialect Serve as a Signal of Social Networks in Job Search? Evidence from China

06-03-2019 3:00 pm -5:00 pm
New Campus, Museum, 1st floor

Date and Time: June 3rd, 2019, 3:00 pm - 5:00pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Team diverstiy is beneficial for performance but also decrease team cohesion (O´Reilly et.al. 1989; Milliken & Martins, 1996), then when hiring a team member how do the leader treat the cultural difference between them? This paper address this problem using a novel database drawing from the Chinese job-interview television show Only You during 2010-2016, and study how the dialectal distance between the applicant and the interviewer, who is also the team leader, affect the outcome of hiring.

We have found a U-shape relationship which implies an applicant with either closer cultural identity or more distant cultural identity helps to increase the probability of being hired by the leader compared to a moderate cultural distance. Mechanism analysis shows, culture-fit and complementary in social networks explains different parts of U-shape respectively.

11
Jun
2019

Kuoping Chang (Xi'an Jiaotong University) - Behavioral Economics versus Traditional Economics: Are They Very Different?

06-11-2019 3:00 pm -5:00 pm
New Campus, Museum, 1st floor

Date and Time: June 11th, 2019, 3:00 pm - 5:00pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Behavioral economics, notably developed by Daniel Kahneman, Amos Tversky and Richard Thaler, has found consistent and pervasive anomalies in common people’s daily behaviors. This paper has employed the concepts in traditional economics (e.g., choice, relative price, and opportunity cost) to analyze the anomalies found in behavioral economics. The results show that quite a few anomalies, such as preference reversal, isolation effect and sunk cost fallacy, do not exist.
This is not to say that people always make rational choices. The findings of the paper conclude, however, that common people may not be as irrational as behavioral economists have suggested (in some situations, common people may act more like a rational economist).

About the speaker

Kuoping Chang is an appointed professor at Xi`an Jiaotong University. He received his PhD Degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He published more than ten papers in international peer-reviewed journals.