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Date and Time: December 24th, 2019, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

In this paper, we explore the effects of dialect diversity on economic performance by drawing evidence from Chinese prefecture-level cities. Our dataset is a panel of 5-year average data over the period from 2001 to 2015 including 274 cities. We compute five indices of dialect diversity: 1. Dialect fractionalization; 2. Adjusted dialect fractionalization; 3. Dialect polarization, 4. Adjusted dialect polarization and 5. Periphery heterogeneity. The baseline specification is done through a fixed effect model. Approaches, pooled-2SLS, FE-2SLS and IV-GMM, are also applied to reduce the impact of endogeneity. We find that in China economic benefits from dialect diversity.

Date and Time: December 18th, 2019, 3:00 - 5:00 pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

This paper shows how property rights security improves over time as a result of increasing legal quality and political democratization in a political economy context, where political and legal institutions adapt to evolving factor composition of land and capital in the dynamic economic development process. There seems to exist a clear sequence of different forms of protection in that it is unlikely to have a strong rule of law with an exploitative political regime, or to have a democratic political system when the distribution of potential coercive power is too skewed.


Date and Time: September 27th, 2019, 3:00 - 5:00 pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Using high speed rail connection information and patent citation data, we find robust patterns linking direct HSR connection with increased patent citations between Chinese cities. Furthermore, HSR connection is shown to slow down the delay in knowledge diffusion over distance. And in turn, increased patent citations help promote innovation. The heterogeneity in the effects of HSR connection is also largely in line with expectations, with industries with higher transportation costs and faster technological upgrading experiencing larger impact of HSR connection.


Date and Time: June 17th, 2019, 4:00 - 6:00pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to shed some new light on the relationship between financial development and trade in value-added also known as global value chains (GVC). Following the literature emphasizing the channel by which the first factor impacts upon the second one, we consider the position in GVC as being a variable likely to convey this influence in the current context of cross-border sharing activities.


Date and Time: June 11th, 2019, 3:00 pm - 5:00pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Behavioral economics, notably developed by Daniel Kahneman, Amos Tversky and Richard Thaler, has found consistent and pervasive anomalies in common people’s daily behaviors. This paper has employed the concepts in traditional economics (e.g., choice, relative price, and opportunity cost) to analyze the anomalies found in behavioral economics. The results show that quite a few anomalies, such as preference reversal, 

Date and Time: June 10th, 2019, 3:00 pm - 5:00pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Consumer often stockpile for future consumption. In this paper, we connect consumer stockpiling and market entry by introducing consumer stockpiling behaviour into a dynamic circumstance of n-firm oligopoly with differentiated products. First, we show that for any finite number of firms and positive transaction costs, any symmetric equilibrium involves a positive level of consumer stockpiling. Second, by introducing free entry, we show that the excess entry theorem continues to hold despite the extra inter-temporal effects on consumer stockpiling. Our result extends to the case of new consumers in the future market, and the case where firm to incur an inventory cost.


Date and Time: June 3rd, 2019, 3:00 pm - 5:00pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

Team diverstiy is beneficial for performance but also decrease team cohesion (O´Reilly et.al. 1989; Milliken & Martins, 1996), then when hiring a team member how do the leader treat the cultural difference between them? This paper address this problem using a novel database drawing from the Chinese job-interview television show Only You during 2010-2016, and study how the dialectal distance between the applicant and the interviewer, who is also the team leader, affect the outcome of hiring.


Date and Time: November 29th, 2018, 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

We study what happens to identified shocks and to dynamic responses when the structural model features q disturbances and m endogenous variables, q ≤ m, but only m1 < q variables are used in the empirical model. Aggregation create problems. Appropriate theoretical restrictions may be insufficient to obtain the structural disturbances and the dynamics they produce. Identified shocks do not necessarily combine structural disturbancees of the same type.


Date and Time: May 17th, 2018, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Room: A 101 in the Economics Building (Museum)

Abstract

This study explores the welfare and distributional effects of fiscal volatility using a neoclassical stochastic growth model with incomplete markets. In our model, households face uninsurable idiosyncratic risks in their labor income and discount factor processes, and ...


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